PinoyScientists

yes, we exist! get to know us.

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Meet Myrron Albert Callera Aguila:

1. What do you do?

I am currently a M.S./Ph.D student working on integrating carbon nanotubes in nanoscale radiofrequency devices.   

2. Where do you work?

I am currently enrolled in the Department of Engineering and System Science in National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. I do my research in the Quantum Electronics Laboratory in the Institute of Physics of Academia Sinica in Nangang, Taipei, Taiwan. 

3. Tell us about the photos!

(Top:) Here I am wearing my clean room suit in the clean room at the basement of the Institute of Physics. At that time, I just got my license to use one of the Institute’s scanning electron microscopes. 

(Bottom:) Playing paintball at 147, Neihu, New Taipei with some of my friends in Taipei. At the end of the day, even though we lost the battle and got our bodies hit by paintball pellets, we enjoyed firing paintball pellets at the enemy team, and left the place with smiles and laughter.

4. Tell us about your academic career path so far.

Here is a brief overview of my educational background: Elementary and High School in Elizabeth Seton School, Las Pinas City => B.S. Physics and in Material Science and Engineering in Ateneo de Manila University => Part-time research assistant in the Chemistry Department of Ateneo de Manila University => M. S. and Ph. D. in Nano Science and Technology under the Taiwan International Graduate Program of Academia Sinica. So far, I plan on pursuing a career either in industry or in consulting after I obtain my doctorate degree. 

5. Anything else I want to share?

Aside from doing research, I recently engage myself in different activities such as cooking for myself, investing in Philippine-based mutual funds, travelling with friends, attending dancing sessions, learning Mandarin, and lastly, playing paintball, laser tag, badminton and DOTA with friends. I also want to form future connections with the scientists and non-scientists out there through my Linkedin and Researchgate profiles.

Filed under physics quantum electronics nanotechnology

5 notes

Meet Michelle Marie Villamayor:

(1) What do you do?
I design and develop plasma devices to deposit thin films used as semiconductors for solar cells and other light reactive materials. 

(2) Where do you work? 

I’m a researcher at the National Insitute of Physics at UP Diliman and I frequently visit Doshisha University (~three weeks every year) in Kyoto, Japan as an exchange researcher. 

(3) What do the photos show? 

(Left:) We are testing a newly-built plasma device in the National Institute of Physics, which will eventually deposit metal oxides on cloth, silicon, glass and polymer. The other girl is a Filipina and the boys are our Japanese collaborators. 

(Right:) The second photo shows me and my teammates in the Philippine National Team in Karate during the tournament’s awarding ceremony. 

(4) Tell us about your career path so far.

I graduated Elementary and High School in Bukidnon State University (formerly College) elementary and high school laboratories. My Grade 4 in elementary was spent in Japan because my mother was a Japanese Government scholar and we members of her family (me, my dad and my sister— Grade 2 before) were allowed to accompany her. I finished my bachelor and master’s course, and will graduate in the PhD program this year in the National Institute of Physics. My options for postdoctoral positions are Japan, Korea and Europe— but I’m definitely coming back to the Philippines. 

(5) Is there anything else you want to share?

I think trained scientists abroad should return to the Philippines and act as mentors for the next generation of henyos. The technique to survive the harsh conditions as a scientist in the Philippines is to think long term— about 20 years from now when your first students are already PhD degree holders themselves. Scientists pursuing their fields locally are serving the nation by training young and brilliant Filipino minds. The scientists returning today are in a better position compared to before because the country is experiencing rapid economic growth enabling the Department of Science and Technology to aggressively recruit grant applicants. 

*Editor’s note: Salamat Michelle for the wise advise— and for bringing this tumblr back from its hiatus!

Meet Michelle Marie Villamayor:

(1) What do you do?

I design and develop plasma devices to deposit thin films used as semiconductors for solar cells and other light reactive materials.

(2) Where do you work?

I’m a researcher at the National Insitute of Physics at UP Diliman and I frequently visit Doshisha University (~three weeks every year) in Kyoto, Japan as an exchange researcher.

(3) What do the photos show?

(Left:) We are testing a newly-built plasma device in the National Institute of Physics, which will eventually deposit metal oxides on cloth, silicon, glass and polymer. The other girl is a Filipina and the boys are our Japanese collaborators.

(Right:) The second photo shows me and my teammates in the Philippine National Team in Karate during the tournament’s awarding ceremony.

(4) Tell us about your career path so far.

I graduated Elementary and High School in Bukidnon State University (formerly College) elementary and high school laboratories. My Grade 4 in elementary was spent in Japan because my mother was a Japanese Government scholar and we members of her family (me, my dad and my sister— Grade 2 before) were allowed to accompany her. I finished my bachelor and master’s course, and will graduate in the PhD program this year in the National Institute of Physics. My options for postdoctoral positions are Japan, Korea and Europe— but I’m definitely coming back to the Philippines.

(5) Is there anything else you want to share?

I think trained scientists abroad should return to the Philippines and act as mentors for the next generation of henyos. The technique to survive the harsh conditions as a scientist in the Philippines is to think long term— about 20 years from now when your first students are already PhD degree holders themselves. Scientists pursuing their fields locally are serving the nation by training young and brilliant Filipino minds. The scientists returning today are in a better position compared to before because the country is experiencing rapid economic growth enabling the Department of Science and Technology to aggressively recruit grant applicants.

*Editor’s note: Salamat Michelle for the wise advise— and for bringing this tumblr back from its hiatus!

Filed under physics plasma physics

5 notes

Get to know Clement Yu:

1. What do you do? I lead a team of engineers in the design of various complex medical devices and diagnostic instruments.

2. Where do you work? I am currently the Director of Systems Engineering for Thoratec Corporation, a company that specializes in implanted systems for long-term treatment of heart failure.

3. Tell us about the photos: (Top:) To keep up with the different technologies in my field, my colleagues and I regularly attend conferences, both near and far. (Bottom:) For stress relief, I turn to either golf or taking care of my orchids.

4. Tell us about your career path so far. I did my undergraduate in Electrical Engineering at the University of the Philippines, Diliman. I first learned about biomedical engineering during my senior year at UP, from a professor that just finished his graduate degree in that field. He inspired me to continue on with a masters and a doctorate in Biomedical Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in upstate New York. After graduating, I briefly taught undergraduate engineering classes before working in the health care field with several companies on developing a wide range of biomedical devices.

5. Do you have anything else to share? I am happily married with two sons who are growing up rather quickly. Someday, when they leave the nest, I hope I can have the opportunity to inspire other young budding engineers from the Philippines, much like that professor I met in my formative years.

Filed under engineering biomedical engineering

11 notes

Meet Anthony Longjas:

1) What do you do? I’m a physicist. My current research interests are on geophysical processes that exhibit anomalous diffusion and on climate and human dynamics as amplifiers of natural change.

2) Where do you work? I’m a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics, St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota.

3) Tell us about the photos? (Top:) Outside the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. The lab is overlooking the Mississippi river with the Minneapolis downtown just across the bridge.  With me is Sir Jun Abrajano, Acting Deputy Assistant Director, Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) of the National Science Foundation in the US. (Bottom:) Rockstar, dude!

5) Anything else you want to share? I am equally passionate about Philippine sports, investing in the stock market and astronomy.

Filed under physics geophysics

5 notes

The 1st Pinoy Scientists meetup was a success!

"Some 40 scientists —from fields ranging from theoretical physics and molecular biology to chemistry and disaster and climate studies— came together to talk about what it means to be a scientist in the Philippines, and how to communicate the importance of their work to the larger public."

Read the full story featured on GMA News Online (thanks to Shai Panela and TJ Dimacali of their Science and Tech section).

Thanks again to all who came— you made it clear that there is a lot of potential for this budding community— and a lot of work ahead!

More post-meetup notes to follow… something is brewing. Please stay tuned. :)

— Reina

(Photo credits: Quirino Sugon (top) and Shai Panela (bottom).)

Filed under messages

3 notes

Meet Joseph “Jolo” Diamante:

1) What do you do? I am pursuing a Masters degree in Chemical Engineering in the field of chemical cybernetics. My current focus is the development of planning tools for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).

2) Where do you work? I am currently a full time student at De La Salle University Manila. Animo La Salle!

3) Tell us about the photos. (Top:) Just before a seminar on disaster risk management, with several of the DLSU Center for Sustainable Development and Research team members. I’m in the middle of the photo, and to my left is the director, Dr. Raymond Tan.

(Bottom:) At the office, preparing some delicious Banh Mi or Vietnamese sandwiches, yum!

4) Anything else you want to share? I’m single and ready to mingle (haha). I love to travel, though I seldom get to go around because of budget constraints. First the Philippines, and then the world!

Filed under Chemical Engineering

8 notes

Get to know Marvin Montefrio:

1) What do you do? I am an interdisciplinary environmental scholar, currently doing research on indigenous communities in upland Palawan involved in the production of “low carbon commodities.”

2) Where do you work? I am a doctoral candidate at the Environmental and Natural Resources Policy program of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

3) Tell us about the photos. (Top:) Ethnography in an indigenous community in southern Palawan; (Bottom:) Picking strawberries in upstate NY for a semester’s worth of PB&J sandwich.  

4) Anything else do you want to share? Please contact me (mfmontef@syr.edu or http://mfmontef.mysite.syr.edu) if you’d like to collaborate, or would want to know more about secret destinations in Palawan!

Filed under environmental science ethnography

10 notes

Meet Bren Mark Felisilda:

1) What do you do? I am a chemist. I’m presently pursuing my Master of Engineering degree in Applied Chemistry, with a major in Electrochemistry. My current research is focused on the application of electrochemistry (electrocatalysts) to water and wastewater remediation.

2) Where do you work? I’m a graduate student and research assistant at the Applied Electrochemistry Lab of Hanbat National University, Daejeon, South Korea.

3) Tell us about the photos. (Top:) Random photos of me in the labfrom a not-so-busy day (left) and a busy day (right)— that’s why I didn’t bother to fix my hair (hehehe).

(Bottom:) Performing is my other passion. If I did not pursue chemistry, I would have been a professional dancer by now. This is me moments before the Semi-Finals Night of Pilipinas Got Talent Season 1.

4) Anything else do you want to share? I’d like to form networks with fellow scientists for future collaboration. You can follow me thru LinkedIn and
ResearchGate.

Filed under electrochemistry engineering applied chemistry

8 notes

Get to know Dexter Lo (aka Prof. deX):

1) What do you do?I work on Disaster Risk Management at the micro-scale. Once in a while, I scribble poems and post them in Facebook.

2) Where do you work? I’m the Founding Director of the Engineering Resource Center in Xavier University - Ateneo de Cagayan. If you’re looking for me, I’m usually in the field (not in the office =)).

3) Tell us about the photos? (Top:) Giving a lecture on “Why Disasters Happen?” to the Council of Asian Liberals and Democrats, university students and professors, government, and CSOs.

(Bottom:) On weekends, I accompany my dad to his peri-urban farm. It’s always a good time to reflect, bond with nature, and share stories with local children under the trees.

4) Anything else you want to share? Duty, Service, and Love (DSL)— that’s how I do it! More about us here.

Filed under disaster risk management engineering